• Climate Change Is the Ultimate “OK, Boomer” Issue

    On a Sunday in November, 170 students filed into the Vermont Statehouse, using the legislature’s chambers to talk about the climate crisis and solutions for their state. Participants in the Youth Climate Congress, who ranged from middle school to college, with law students joining the committees to answer legal questions that came up as proposals were drafted, spent the day proposing and debating transportation, energy and heating, agriculture, and environmental justice policies. The state’s...

  • Republicans are Defining Foreign Interference Down

    Texas Senator Ted Cruz is not a fool, but he seems to think that Americans—or at least Meet the Press viewers—are fools. Conservative outlets and pundits have long claimed that Ukrainian officials interfered in the 2016 presidential election to undermine then-candidate Donald Trump and aid Hillary Clinton. Over the past three months, the claim has spread from backwater right-wing conspiracy theorists to the highest reaches of the Republican Party. “Do you believe Ukraine meddled in the election...

  • Congressman Objects to Casino-Goers Being Subject to Local Law if They Assault Women

    Yesterday, the House Natural Resources Committee held a hearing on Representative Deb Haaland’s Justice for Native Survivors of Sexual Violence Act, which she introduced in July with a bipartisan group of co-sponsors including Republicans Paul Cook and Tom Cole, as well as fellow Democrats Ruben Gallego and Sharice Davids. The bill would allow the law enforcement offices of tribal nations to prosecute non-tribal citizen offenders for crimes including sexual assault, sex trafficking, and...

  • The Health Care Debate Has Baked Up Some Flimsy Media Narratives

    The consensus among wonks and pundits is that Democratic politicians who support Medicare for All are saddling themselves with an unpopular policy. Never mind whether they’re supporting an effective policy; it’s considered gauche for savvy pundit types to evince concern over the hoi polloi. No, the tried and true know that the electoral fortunes of political elites is America’s paramount concern. And so, with a certain amount of breathlessness, the end of Kamala Harris’ candidacy, and the recent...

  • The Media’s Disingenuous Narrative About Medicare for All

    The consensus among wonks is that Democratic politicians who support Medicare for All are saddling themselves with an unpopular policy. Never mind whether they’re supporting an effective policy; it’s considered gauche for savvy pundit types to evince concern over the hoi polloi. No, the tried and true know that the electoral fortunes of political elites is America’s paramount concern. And so, with a certain amount of breathlessness, the end of Kamala Harris’s candidacy and the recent drop in...

  • John Kerry Endorses Joe Biden’s Delusions

    If Nate Silver’s band of Bayesians can be believed, former Vice President Joe Biden is winning the 2020 presidential race’s “endorsement primary”—and by a substantial margin. Whether this stray factoid makes a difference in an era of weak political parties and skepticism of elite opinion is a question that can’t be answered, but Biden nevertheless has a new data point to brag about: John Kerry has added his endorsement to the pile.

  • Duncan Hunter Did Something Right

    Congressman Duncan Hunter seemed in no hurry to get back inside to the Christmas party at a Capitol Hill Mexican restaurant thrown by a Norwegian weapons company, so we each lit up another cigarette, and he called me a bitch for smoking Marlboro Lights. Hunter preferred unfiltereds, but that night, the Republican firebrand wasn’t above bumming one of mine. I took a small bag from my pocket, packed it with medical weed, and lit a bowl. The world is hard for me to deal with on a good day, but a...

  • André Aciman’s Dance to the Music of Time

    It’s a little misleading to call Find Me, the new novel by André Aciman, a sequel to Call Me by Your Name, Aciman’s first novel, which was published in 2007 and adapted in 2017 into a critically acclaimed film by the director Luca Guadagnino. Call Me by Your Name chronicles the smoldering romance between Elio, an American teenager living with his parents in Italy, and their houseguest, Oliver, a doctoral student. The romance, like the summer, ends, and though the pair meet sporadically...

  • The Uneasy Uplift of The Testaments

    When I first read The Handmaid’s Tale, the world was in the midst of a huge social experiment: If we just told girls that sexism was over, would it somehow turn out to be true? Growing up as a (rich, white) girl in the 1980s and ’90s was to be the target of a mind-blowing amount of propaganda related to girlhood: Being a girl was great and fun and sparkly and magic and a superpower and also completely ordinary and normal and nothing to worry about at all. In my experience, this method was...

  • Don’t Embrace Originalism to Defend Trump’s Impeachment

    In the pending congressional impeachment inquiry, the House Judiciary Committee is charged with (among other things) taking up the question of what the constitutional process of impeachment means. To aid them in this solemn task, committee Chairman Jerry Nadler and his colleagues on Wednesday summoned an impressive list of constitutional scholars to offer authoritative interpretations of the Constitution’s impeachment clauses.

  • In Making Comics, Lynda Barry Shares the Secrets of Her Success

    Whenever I find myself in my sons’ school, taking in the crayon scribbles that line the hallway, I think of this, from John Guare’s Six Degrees of Separation: When the kids were little, we went to a parents meeting at their school and I asked the teacher why are all her students were geniuses in the second grade? Look at the first grade. Blotches of green and black. Look at third grade. Camouflage. But the second grade—your grade. Matisses everyone. You’ve made my child a Matisse. Let me study...