LITERARY FICTION


by Mail Online

Mail Online— There has been a vogue for autobiographical fiction in recent years, fuelled by the hoo-ha over Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle, drawn in minute detail from the author's own life.

Philstar.com—History: Forgeries, fictions. I recently posted on Facebook that it was a Cebuano, Enrique, who was the first to go around the world. I am very glad that the post evoked so many replies, informing me that we are indeed interested in our own history.

the Guardian—Top 10 homecomings in fiction. From Colm Tóibín to Margaret Atwood and Yaa Gyasi, these stories reflect on the ambivalent complications of going back to where you’re from With lockdown stretching on, one thing my friends and I are quietly admitting to each other is that we feel homesick. Homesick for life as it was, of course, but also for the places we can’t return to any more. The ones we didn’t even realise were still “home”: the countries where we were born, the cities where we grew up, the villages we couldn’t wait to...

The New Republic—The Enduring Fiction of Affordable Housing. In October of 2018, Leslie Hernandez stood in the hallway of her building, an olive-green stucco and concrete complex in Los Angeles’s Chinatown, trying to communicate with her neighbor Benson Lai, an elder in his early 60s and a monolingual Cantonese speaker. She held up an official notice of a rent increase, which had been given to tenants throughout the building, and tore it in half. Then she took the pieces and tore those too. Lai’s “okay” in response is one origin story for the Hillside...