“I Was the Fastest Girl in America, Until I Joined Nike”


by kottke.org

kottke.org— Mary Cain was on her way — and quickly. As detailed in a 2015 NY Times piece by Elizabeth Weil, Cain ran a mile in 5:03 as a 7th grader and by the time she was a high school sophomore, ran the 1,500 meters in 4:11.01. Her high school track coach didn’t know how to coach her properly, so when Nike called, she joined a legendary coach training a team of fellow track stars to see how far she could go. And according to Cain, that’s when everything fell apart. A big part of this problem is that...

www.nytimes.com—I Was the Fastest Girl in America, Until I Joined Nike. Mary Cain’s male coaches were convinced she had to get “thinner, and thinner, and thinner.” Then her body started breaking down.

Boing Boing—Athlete Mary Cain: "I Was the Fastest Girl in America, Until I Joined Nike". Mary Cain, a middle-distance runner, reports that her male coaches' constant demands she get “thinner, and thinner, and thinner” hurt her health and career. The crux of the problem: she joined a program operated by Nike, whose priority is selling shoes, not training athletes. The New York Times: The problem is so widespread it affected the only other female athlete featured in the last Nike video ad Cain appeared in, the figure skater Gracie Gold. When the ad came out in 2014, like Cain, Gold...

Mail Online—Fastest girl in America Mary Cain accuses Nike of physically and emotionally abusing her in training. Track and field athlete, Mary Cain, once the 'fastest girl in America' on Thursday urged Nike to change their system after her former coach Alberto Salazar was banned after a doping investigation.